Saturday, August 1, 2015

#Acuvue #Oasys Multi-Focal Contact Lenses

Things that happen when you get older

So, it's happened. The Eye Dr. found out that I can't see things up close when wearing my glasses or contact lenses. I'm ok to see up close without them, but I often need reading glasses with my contacts to see little print...The frames on my glasses are fairly small, so I just look around the lenses when I need to read up close. 
Anyway, her response was to have me try out some multi-focal contact lenses. Yes, bi-focal, but contact lenses. I have a hard time wrapping my head around the way they actually work because the things sit right on your eyeball, so although I have experienced looking through different areas of the lenses I still don't quite understand how I'm able to do it. 
I tried a couple of pairs, the first one had the issue that I couldn't figure out how to not look through the close vision area in my right eye. As a motorcycle rider, this is problematic because I need to be able to clearly see shit. I tried another pair. 

Acuvue Oasys With Hydraclear for Presbyopia

Ok, so I admit it. The name sounds like a load of horse shit. Marketing overkill, and frankly if I was over marketing I'd have the urge to fire someone over coming up with the name. 
That said, the lenses themselves, are pretty damn nice. Over the last couple of years I've gotten hooked on daily wear lenses. Yes, they do cost more than other options, but the time and money saved in no maintenance, no cleaners, just the lenses and a saline rinse should the need arise is worth it to me. Open a lens pop it in, at the end of the day drop it in the trash. It doesn't get much better than this. 
So, aside from that, what do you get?

The Pros

These lenses are crazy comfortable. I really mean that. For the last couple of years I've been wearing CooperVision Proclear lenses. I've been very happy with them, but I'm switching to the Acuvue Hydraclear lenses this time around. They're noticeably more comfortable right out of the box, and they stay that way all day. 
The multifocal lenses are pretty cool once you can figure them out. Clear distance vision, and when you find the sweet spot you can read that tiny little text without effort. That was an odd experience for me. I'm used to squinting and blinking and finally giving in to go get my reading glasses. It is awesome to be able to easily see everything right there in front of me. 

The Cons

They are expensive. They'll run nearly twice what the single vision daily wears will cost for a year's supply. For the benefit they give I'll pay it. They work very well, they're super comfortable, so to me they're worth it. The problem is that in the short time that the sample lasts I've been unable to get used to the way they work and use them easily. For example, when riding my motorcycle I tend to move my eyes a lot, my head not so much. Because of this I find myself looking through the near vision portions of the lenses. It's not bad in a "I'm blind" sort of way, but I have zero use for near vision clarity while riding, and it's a distraction I could do without. In the office during meetings I'm switching back and forth between near vision and distance vision. Suddenly I'm unable to see the presentation clearly so I go in to a cycle of blinking and head turning until the screen is clear again. Same thing with switching back to my notebook to take notes. I can't automatically find the zones. 
Similarly, at home, it takes time to find the right vision locations. The other night my wife had a minor episode about a spider on the floor. She pointed, gave me a shoe, and told me where it was. I saw absolutely nothing. There she is freaking out and pointing, and there's just nothing there. Suddenly, my eyes focus and I lock in as the little bastard is running away. It's gone before I can react. On the other hand, making breakfast the other morning out of the blue I could see textures in egg shells that I didn't know existed. 

I probably won't drop the cash to buy these this year... I haven't decided for sure just yet... There's no guarantee that I'll figure out how to use them over the course of the year, and the possibility that I won't makes the cost very unappealing. I will likely get the single vision version of the lenses, but for now I'm thinking I'll just stay with reading glasses. 
Now, if someone wanted to subsidize the extra cost for the multi-focal lenses? That just might push me a little more in the "go for it" column.